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MOUNCE Elizabeth Jane

MOUNCE Elizabeth Jane

Female 1862 - 1944  (82 years)Deceased

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  • Name  MOUNCE Elizabeth Jane 
    Born  30 Jan 1862  , Linn, Iowa, United States Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender  Female 
    1880 US Federal Census  21 Jun 1880  Carl, Adams, Iowa, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  [1
    1880 US Federal Census for Carl, Adams, IA - Page 2
    1880 US Federal Census for Carl, Adams, IA - Page 2
    1910 US Federal Census  21 Apr 1910  Lafayette Township, Ogle, Illinois, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  [2
    • The family was living on Chicago Road.
    1910 US Federal Census for Lafayette, Ogle, IL - Page 3B
    1910 US Federal Census for Lafayette, Ogle, IL - Page 3B
    1910 US Federal Census for Lafayette, Ogle, IL - Page 4A
    1910 US Federal Census for Lafayette, Ogle, IL - Page 4A
    1920 US Federal Census  7 Jan 1920  Rochelle, Ogle, Illinois, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  [3
    • The family is living at 1062 Seventh Street.
    1920 US Federal Census for Rochelle, Ogle, IL - Page 5B
    1920 US Federal Census for Rochelle, Ogle, IL - Page 5B
    1930 US Federal Census  16 Apr 1930  Rochelle, Ogle, Illinois, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  [4
    • The family is living at 713 8th Street.
    1930 US Federal Census for Rochelle, Ogle, IL - Page 17B
    1930 US Federal Census for Rochelle, Ogle, IL - Page 17B
    Died  12 Mar 1944 
    Age  82 years 
    Buried  Lawnridge Cemetery, Rochelle, Ogle, Illinois, United States Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Submit Headstone Photo Submit Headstone Photo 
    Person ID  I12298  One Big Family Tree
    Last Modified  3 Jul 2011 

    Father  MOUNCE John Dixon,   b. 1838,   d. 1938  Age: 100 years 
    Family ID  F6793  Group Sheet

    Family  TILTON Henry,   b. 27 Apr 1852, Lafayette Township, Ogle, Illinois, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 25 Aug 1941, Rochelle, Ogle, Illinois, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  Age: 89 years 
    Married  24 Jun 1877  Corning, Adams, Iowa, United States Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Henry and Elizabeth Tilton
    Henry and Elizabeth Tilton
    This charcoal drawing was found upside down, being used as a shelf, in the old Spencer Tilton home. The then current owners called around and finally the picture was returned to a granddaughter, Leola Cain. She thought perhaps that it was a wedding picture, but upon reading Grandma Tilton's biography, there would have been little opportunity and no money at that time for such a luxury. Rather, it is believed that it was made after they returned to IL to take over the Spencer Tilton farm, which was in the early 1900.
    Children 
     1. TILTON Howard Lake,   b. 17 Feb 1879, Ashton, Lee, Illinois, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Aft 1951, Des Moines, Polk, Iowa, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  Age: 72 years
     2. TILTON Arthur Garfield,   b. 21 Nov 1880, , , Iowa, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 23 Jun 1953, Glendale, Los Angeles, California, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  Age: 72 years
     3. TILTON Roy E.,   b. 10 May 1883, , , Kansas, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 25 Mar 1963, , Cook, Illinois, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  Age: 79 years
     4. TILTON Leona May,   b. Abt 1885, , , Iowa, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 16 Jun 1951  Age: ~ 66 years
     5. TILTON Eva Irene,   b. 22 Jan 1887, , , Iowa, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1 Jun 1984, Byron, Ogle, Illinois, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  Age: 97 years
     6. TILTON Melvin Warren,   b. 22 Feb 1889, , , Iowa, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 15 Jan 1952, Kerrville, Kerr, Texas, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  Age: 62 years
     7. TILTON Orlo G.,   b. 27 Jun 1890, Bridgewater, Adair, Iowa, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 29 Feb 1956, , San Bernardino, California, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  Age: 65 years
     8. TILTON Elmer J.,   b. Aug 1893, , , Iowa, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. , , Iowa, United States Find all individuals with events at this location
     9. TILTON Ross Arle,   b. 25 Jul 1894, Prescott, Adams, Iowa, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 14 Feb 1967, Gordon, Sheridan, Nebraska, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  Age: 72 years
     10. TILTON Clem,   b. 18 Apr 1897, Creston, Union, Iowa, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 29 Jun 1955, Kenosha, Kenosha, Wisconsin, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  Age: 58 years
     11. TILTON Braidie Henry,   b. 7 Jan 1902, Bridgewater, Adair, Iowa, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 26 Jul 1964, Galesburg, Knox, Illinois, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  Age: 62 years
    Last Modified  3 Jul 2011 
    Family ID  F4390  Group Sheet

  • Event Map
    Link to Google MapsBorn - 30 Jan 1862 - , Linn, Iowa, United States Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsMarried - 24 Jun 1877 - Corning, Adams, Iowa, United States Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google Maps1880 US Federal Census - 21 Jun 1880 - Carl, Adams, Iowa, United States Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google Maps1910 US Federal Census - 21 Apr 1910 - Lafayette Township, Ogle, Illinois, United States Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google Maps1920 US Federal Census - 7 Jan 1920 - Rochelle, Ogle, Illinois, United States Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google Maps1930 US Federal Census - 16 Apr 1930 - Rochelle, Ogle, Illinois, United States Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsBuried - < - - Lawnridge Cemetery, Rochelle, Ogle, Illinois, United States Link to Google Earth
     = Link to Google Maps 
     = Link to Google Earth 
    Pin Legend  : Address       : Location       : City/Town       : County/Shire       : State/Province       : Country       : Not Set

  • Photos
    Elizabeth Jane Mounce Tilton
    Elizabeth Jane Mounce Tilton
    Mounce Family
    Mounce Family
    This is a compiled picture of five generations. Upper left is John Dixon Mounce, lower left is his daughter, Elizabeth Mounce Tilton, lower right is her daughter, Leona May Tilton Beaman, and upper right is her daughter Opal Walker, and in the middle is her son, Darrel Walker.

  • Notes 
    • Compiler has gathered stories from the remaining living cousins (1999) with whom contact has been made.
      Leola Cain, reports a story that Grandma told her of her early childhood, when she lived on the prairie. Because there was no money for dress goods, Grandma Tilton's mother (Abigail Wortham) made a dress from the canvas cover of the wagon. This was her only dress and was the one she wore to school when she was able to attend. Because of it, the other children called her "canvasback". Seems things have not really changed in all these years, children still make fun of those who are different. But then maybe they have changed, children then, didn't take guns to school, at least not to get rid of those who teased them for being different and yet today guns in school are a grave concern. To finish Leola's story, in time there was a new dress for Lizzie. A lovely pink dress. How proud she was of that new dress, however, she was denied the opportunity of wearing it to school, the reason is lost, perhaps of bad weather, or it was to good for everyday. Whatever the reason, she told her grandchild, that it was the bitterest disappointment she ever had.
      I remember her patience. He skin was very wrinkled and as a five year old child it facinated me. One time, she must have been sewing because she was in her chair in the dining room and there were pins on the small table in front of her. I stuck pins into the skin on the back of her hand fascinated that they didn't seem to hurt, and that they would stick and stand on their own. She never scolded me, or complained. She gave me a moment to observe and then very gently said, "That's enough now."
      Darel Tilton, another grandson, tells a story which I think reflects her strength and perhaps the limit of her patience. It was the family tradition that the men were always served their meal first, and when they had finished the women and children ate. Grandpa was complaining because dinner was not ready, he was hungry and was ready to eat. If my Dad's manner of teasing reflected his own father, I can say such teasing rarely sat well with the recipient. Apparently, this complaining did not sit well with our grandmother either. She told my grandfather he could wait for his dinner she was going to feed the children first. This changed the family tradition and from that day on the children were always fed before the men. Women's liberation! Well not exactly, but a small step in the right direction.
      When Darel told of the men seated first, it was an ah-ha experience bringing to mind a story my father told, and with it a greater understanding of the significance of that story. The men, my grandfather and his brothers and the adult male children were all seated at the dinner table. The butter was passed with the butter plate carefully turned so that when combined with a subtle shove (and it is obvious this is where my father picked up the habit) the recipient's thumb would be smeared. This particular meal the shove-er worn a full beard. The recipient of the butter, calmly scooped the butter from the plate and casually flipped it into the joker's beard. A food fight followed. When I look at the picture of Great Grandma Amy Hardesty I am not sure that I would want to be any one of her son's on that occasion. But that is pure speculation, the story always ended with the food fight, never with who cleaned up the mess. Did the women and children even have food left to eat?
      My mother tells the story of when they came to live with Elizabeth and Henry in Rochelle, she ironed all of my father's clothes including his boxer underwear. It didn't take Grandma Tilton long to straighten her out. If Braidie wanted his underwear ironed, he could very well do it himself!
      My mother also remembers the men always going off and having a good time and leaving Grandma with all the work. This story she tells in her autobiography.
      Grandma and Grandpa never had a Christmas tree, until the year that we lived with them and then there was a little tree for me. I know that I was pampered. Grandma always kept the salt, pepper, sugar and butter along with the jar of spoons on the kitchen table, and covered it all with a clean tea towel. I often would sneak to the kitchen, lift the towel to eat some of the butter from the plate. I never remember her scolding me for this. Her hard life, forced her to be very frugal. I had a store bought cotton jump rope which I frayed by tying it onto the iron railing outside the front door. Grandma took string and wrapped the jump rope end to end so that it wouldn't break where it had frayed.
      Darel's wife, said that Grandma was so sweet, she would talk with her often while he was off during the second world war.
      Dorothy Beaman recalled the penny ante games. She said that her husband, Wilson would never play, because of the way the Tilton men acted. Mother recalls on their 65th wedding anniversary, someone started playing penny ante. When Grandma saw money on the table she swept it all off into her apron, "No one gambles in my house, this money goes to the mission." There is either some conflict as the stories are remembered, or perhaps after 65 years of marriage, Grandma had just had enough.
      Uncle Ross used to tell the story, of coming home after drinking, and knowing that he dare not go into the house with liquor on his breathe. So he went to the buggy to sleep. Only, that space was already occupied with his Dad and one of his brothers.
      Grandma would fix all her bread and rolls for the week, and leave it to the toughest boy to do the baking on Saturday while she shopped. His job was not only to bake but to defend the week's supply from the other boys. Grandma found some very inventive hiding places for those baked goods, even going so far one time to hid it among the dirty clothes.
      Grandmother's sister, Venita "Aunt Nettie" came fairly regularly to visit her sister. Her husband came one time. Grandmother, never left home, not even to attend her father's funeral. Whether this was because there was never any money or because Grandpa wouldn't allow it I don't know. I am sure by 1938 when Grandpa Mounce died, there were several of her sons who could have contributed to raise train fare to Wichita KS for the funeral. Certainly there was enough money in 1931 for Grandpa to go to Nebraska and bring his brother, Harvey's body back for burial in IL.
      Dorothy Beaman recalls a visit to IL by Grandpa Mounce during which he stayed with Aunt Ona. (see John Dixon Mounce's bio for more details). Dorothy could only say that perhaps he felt more welcomed there.
      Grandpa had a hup mobile, (I have no idea what kind of an automobile that is,) but after his death, Grandma traded it to someone for a vacuum sweeper. Mother was sure that it was far more valuable than a vacuum.

  • Sources 
    1. [S480] 1880 US Federal Census for Adams Co., IA, IA, Adams County, (www.ancestry.com: National Archives and Records Administration, 2010), T9, roll 325, Carl, enumeration district (ED) 11, p. 2, dwelling 15, family 15, Elizabeth J. Tilton, accessed 28 Mar 2011 (Reliability: 3), 28 Mar 2011.

    2. [S466] 1910 US Federal Census for Ogle Co., IL, IL, Ogle County, (www.ancestry.com: National Archives and Records Administration, 2006), T624, roll 314, Lafayette, enumeration district (ED) 73, sheet 3B-4A, p. 139B-140A, dwelling 67, family 68, Elizabeth J. Tilton, accessed 28 Mar 2011 (Reliability: 3), 28 Mar 2011.

    3. [S481] 1920 US Federal Census for Ogle Co., IL, IL, Ogle County, (www.ancestry.com: National Archives and Records Administration, 2010), T625, roll 398, Rochelle, enumeration district (ED) 87, sheet 5B, p. 83B, dwelling 130, family 139, Elizabeth J. Tilton, accessed 28 Mar 2011 (Reliability: 3), 28 Mar 2011.

    4. [S482] 1930 US Federal Census for Ogle Co., IL, IL, Ogle County, (www.ancestry.com: National Archives and Records Administration, 2002), T626, roll 546, Rochelle, enumeration district (ED) 10, sheet 17B, p. 70B, dwelling 419, family 459, Elizabeth Tilton, accessed 28 Mar 2011 (Reliability: 3), 28 Mar 2011.